nadine at home kids.jpg

Hi.

I'm Nadine. Thanks for stopping by. The floors are creaky, the kids are loud, but the door's always open and the coffee's always on.

Make yourself at home.

Rejection: Both Sides Now

Rejection: Both Sides Now

 Gemma Correll "Nope" Mug -  Made By Ohh Deer

Gemma Correll "Nope" Mug - Made By Ohh Deer

Writers are accustomed to rejection. More often than not, we send inquiries into the abyss, never hearing from anyone. Sometimes we receive an auto response or form letter. And (very) occasionally we'll get a personal "not this time" email. Whatever. It's fine. It's how this creative world works.

Today, however, I wrote my own rejection letter. Because sometimes being offered the job is worse than not having one at all.


Hi, [name redacted].

Thanks for getting back to me.

Unfortunately, I’m going to have to decline the offer to move forward with [nameless website].

I had assumed that because the ad requested skilled freelance writers (with English or journalism backgrounds), it would pay more professionally than it does.

Five dollars for 250 words is insulting to any human, regardless of writing experience.

(This means that I would have to write 20 merchant-page write-ups — or 5,000 words — just to make $100, a ridiculous labour-to-wage ratio. And an impossible rate if you value quality at all.)

Fun fact: 2,000 words a day is generally accepted as maxing out, writing-wise. You can’t keep up with a higher quota for very long. 

Please reconsider your pay model. For the sake of real writers…and people who like to buy groceries. What you’re offering is, essentially, nothing.

Sincerely,

Nadine

Weekend Reading Vol. 22: Pockets, Chores and Forever Plaid (Like Cher)

Weekend Reading Vol. 22: Pockets, Chores and Forever Plaid (Like Cher)

Low, High, DIY: The Telephone Purse

Low, High, DIY: The Telephone Purse